The Land of Fire and Ice

16 May, 2016 Iceland

The Blue Lagoon is a must have experience on a trip to Iceland. One visit to this iconic geothermal spring and the reasoning behind Iceland's title "the land of fire and ice" is satisfied. Steam rises from tantalising aqua blue waters of the lagoon, set against a backdrop of deep grey, snow capped mountains. To reach the lagoon's water you must first brave the biting Icelandic air. As icy winds whip around you the steaming blue becomes even more welcoming and a dash through the exposed elements makes sinking into the naturally heated waters even more rewarding.

Approximately 90% of Iceland's power comes from harnessing the geothermal activity beneath it's surface. The Blue Lagoon is also a result of this geothermal activity. I visited it on an Easter weekend in early April when temperatures were hovering at 0 degrees and hailstones fell intermittently from a threatening grey sky. Sinking into the warm water, within minutes any stress I had floated away into the steam around me.

That particular day the scene was awash with shades of contrasting blues and greys, tinted with subtle purple hues, in the water, dark looming clouds and the distant mountain peaks.

As is common practice I covered myself with the silica mud available on site that has been proven to help clear skin conditions, let it dry in everywhere, and plunged back into the warm water. I emerged two hours later thoroughly refreshed and relaxed.

I couldn't leave without trying to capture the essence of the place. That particular day the scene was awash with shades of contrasting blues and greys, tinted with subtle purple hues, in the water, dark looming clouds and the distant mountain peaks. Yet, instead of feeling cold and foreboding there was a welcoming warmth to it all, introduced by the steam rising lazily from the mineral rich lagoon. A visual treat to draw you in and call you back again and again. As it turns out, Iceland is spectacularly gifted in that regard.